Oct 21, 2008

Historic Opportunity

During the Republican National Convention, I was struck by the comments of several young black delegates; btw, black republicans, as with gay republicans, do not require a large convention center when they meet. Back to the point, these three young republicans all stated they would be voting for Obama come November. They clearly pointed out as blacks, Obama's chance of becoming President, was too hugh of an historic opportunity for them not to support. I was also struck by the terms Colin Powell used to justify his endorsement of Obama; transformational and generational. They seem odd words for an experienced soldier and diplomat. Although I would not hesitate to vote for Colin Powell or even Condoleezza Rice, I will not vote for a inexperienced freshman senator, who has not demonstrated any comprehension of world issues or even the economic principles of capitalism, upon which this country has thrived. Perhaps in time, Obama can mature into a viable candidate, not just an historic opportunity.

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

Mike,


It seems to me that much of the support for Obama is based on emotion rather than rational. The nation stands poised to perhaps elect a man from the extreme of our political spectrum and this aspect of the race isn't even discussed in the mainstream media. Unbelievable.


Scott Armstrong

Anonymous said...

What may appear the extreme to you could very well be the new main stream.

The R's have an old image and an agenda that provides little room for adaptation and growth.

The unspoken cultural justifications behind many of the Right's polices such as segregated schools and regressive taxation (yes it exists on many levels) really doesn't facilitate the opportunity for many American's to fit into the rigid mold of what Republicans would like to see Rs be (i.e middle/upper class, married, with kids in a good school and giving weekly ties to a Christian congregation, yes white is there for a lot of folks too).

For a growing percent of our nation with little upward mobility over the past 25 years and no inclusion by people culturally aligned with the Rs, what do you expect.

It is kind of sad when you looked at all those old people over at Lehigh the other week to see McCain. It was like the last cry of a dieing era. But in reality, they brought it on themselves. Succession is as important, often more important, than ideals.

Anonymous said...

One thing you haven't mentioned is the fact that many voters are on record saying they WON'T vote for Obama because of his color, even if they agree with his politics, which is even more troubling to me.

Anonymous said...

But many Obama voters are on record as saying that they WILL vote for him simply because he is black (despite disagreements with his policies). That is as racist (and troubling) as not voting for him because of his color.

Anonymous said...

Nameless One,


Spare us the big lies- “The unspoken cultural justifications behind many of the Right's polices such as segregated schools and regressive taxation (yes it exists on many levels) really doesn't facilitate the opportunity for many American's to fit into the rigid mold of what Republicans would like to see Rs be (i.e middle/upper class, married, with kids in a good school and giving weekly ties to a Christian congregation, yes white is there for a lot of folks too).”

This clap trap is ugly propaganda and all who repeat it should be ashamed. Republicans unite on the shared belief in small government and family values issues. To imply otherwise is gutter politics.

Scott Armstrong

Bob Jr said...

MM: "freshman senator" ... reminds of JFK. Oh wait, I won't vote for a Catholic because I still live in the 1940s.
Mr. Armstrong: "small government and family values." You mean a do-nothing-for-people and my-values-are-the-right-values government, don't you?

Anonymous said...

Michael Molovinsky, when you say that gay republicans (like black republicans) "do not require a large convention center when they meet," are you suggesting there are fewer homosexuals among republicans than among Democrats or among the general population?

Do you believe the percentage of republicans who are gay is lower than the percentage of democrats who are gay?

Anonymous said...

Nameless one,


Oh how the unworthy comment elicits little desire to respond.

Scott Armstrong

Anonymous said...

George Bush believes in small government? Family values, ok, whatever that means.

Go be smug as you fade into the past. The Republicans are the next Wigs. The Dems need to divide into two new parties that will take us into the future while the Rs reflect among themselves on the good ole days (the 50s were never really as good as they would have you believe) when they reigned supreme.

michael molovinsky said...

the republicans have an official gay group call log cabin, i assume it's smaller than the official democratic group. all the gays i know are democratic. but more to the point, why snark on an admittedly conservative blog, there are other sites which are pro obama

Anonymous said...

Let's just see the vote differential between the 'progressives' of Philly and the racist/rednecks of Western PA.
Thank you Jack Murtha.
I wonder if Biden thinks ol Jack should be in Depends.

Bob Jr. said...

MM, once again you deride any opposing thoughts as snarking. And once again you suggest that non-believers leave this blog for "puff" or "pro-Obama" sites. Isn't that being close-minded?

michael molovinsky said...

bob jr., i appreciate a legitimate question, but not one based on a predetermined agenda of contrariness or hostility, those are snarks, and I'd rather not entertain them. do you doubt that many more gays are democratic than republican?

Bob Jr said...

Honestly, I didn't perceive any pre-determined hostility in the post in question. But I understand if your reaction is more of frustration with contrariness than one of censorship.
To answer your question, I don't doubt that many more openly gay gays are Democratic, but I know quite a few gay people who are Republican but don't wear the fact they're gay on their sleeves. So you have a good point (openly Gay Republican activists don't need a big meeting room) but perhaps so did the anon post in questioning what he/she saw as an assumption on your part. Let's move on.

Anonymous said...

Where would be the rationale in supporting McCain? Look at his judgment alone is choosing Palin. She's going to drag him down.

Anonymous said...

Do Republicans think this new RNC mailer is "fair play" or "hitting below the belt" I'm curious:

> GOP mail ties Obama to terrorists - Yahoo! News

michael molovinsky said...

first, i would like to make a general statement on blogging style. some bloggers like to reply and interact with the comments. some even like to comment and interact with themselves. i'd just as soon state my position in the post, and then not participate in the comment section. in this election, i do not think either side has a hand up in negative advertising. in regard to the ayer's history, i think the shelf life has expired.

Anonymous said...

Mike,


Having as an acquaintance a person who makes no apologies for planting bombs in public places is a legitimate cause for concern. Have we all lost our collective minds here to think this shouldn’t be an issue? Where are the once noble standards of modern “Liberalism”?

Scott Armstrong

Anonymous said...

"Perhaps in time, Obama can mature into a viable candidate, not just an historic opportunity."

The guy knocked of Hilary Clinton in the primary and looks ready to win the presidency by a margin larger than W. Bush and you can't bring yourself to call him viable.

Call him many things, but the guy has proven to be viable.

michael molovinsky said...

the mortgage security debacle was caused by the American Homeownership and Economic Opportunity Act signed by clinton in dec. of 2000. mccain should have made the dem's own the current crisis

anon 12:26, i suppose your correct, obama is a gifted speaker in the age of sound bites

Glenn said...

Have you removed my post or was there a glitch? I said..

"Now, many of those people are out of work. Many have seen their savings eaten away by inflation. Many others on fixed incomes, especially the elderly, have watched helplessly as the cruel tax of inflation wasted away their purchasing power."

"My view of government places trust not in one person or one party, but in those values that transcend persons and parties."

"It is essential that we maintain both the forward momentum of economic growth and the strength of the safety net beneath those in society who need help. We also believe it is essential that the integrity of all aspects of Social Security are preserved."

michael molovinsky said...

glenn, whose quotes are these, and why are you posting them here?

Glenn said...

Well you said, "I was also struck by the terms Colin Powell used to justify his endorsement of Obama"... "They seem odd words for an experienced soldier and diplomat."

Powell describes his reasons as a Republican party who he felt shifted to the far right. Somehow you have questioned his reasoning. Which I believe him to have stated his views correctly.

Another poster stated, "It seems to me that much of the support for Obama is based on emotion rather than rational. The nation stands poised to perhaps elect a man from the extreme of our political spectrum"

Purpose of my post:
* Is it so far out to offer help to those who need help (not the gamers of the system).
* Based on that previous post, are Obama's words from the "extreme of our political spectrum". Would this speech be considered 'left' in today's political climate.
* Would not these words somewhat pertain to the current times in this campaign also?
* I felt a need to anchor onto those previous conservative beliefs and focus less on the things that (in this campaign) are separating rather then uniting .
* I found greater inspiration in the words of this Republican, who attempted to unite and focus on a very honorable campaign. One that seemed to have the integrity and respect that seems to be lacking in this run for office.

They were spoken by R. Reagan at the 1980 RNC convention.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmmgVFByeaI
OR the text here...
http://www.nationalcenter.org/ReaganConvention1980.html

michael molovinsky said...

glenn, like obama, reagan was another great speech giver. reagan of course was governor of california, and ran for president with more background and experience, just not the ability to give speeches. i noticed you have also posted quotes on another site with no explanation. your opinions and your words are welcome here.

Glenn said...

"i noticed you have also posted quotes on another site with no explanation"

I suppose I'm a guilty of baiting a comment in order to point out that those were the words of R. Reagan, not Obama's to make a point. However you were astute enough not to let me slide. Perhaps poor judgment on my part. Maybe I should not give sway to my devious inclinations in the future, eh? :)