Nov 15, 2012

The Obama Era

Once and a while you get to cover a few topics with one post, so it is today. This most compelling painting is currently on display at Lehigh University. The curator explains that the show of African art on Obama was not meant as political, but rather depicts the African art propensity to represent sources of pride. Nelson Mandela is also an often used subject. Although I haven't seen the show, yesterday I chatted with Bill Clark, retired art instructor at Cedar Crest. Clark spends much of his time in Africa, and was very much involved behind the scenes with this show. Because of the subject matter and timing, right before the election, the show was not without controversy. Lehigh art director Ricardo Viera addressed the issue.
"To me that is fine," he says. "I don’t run from controversy." He adds that if it has to occur, the place to be controversial is a university. He says the campus is where these things should be happening because students are supposed to be learning, discussing and seeing all sides of the ideological spectrum."This is about humanistic things," he says. "This is about a person. There are many things beyond politics."
Fordham University President Joseph McShane, as discussed in yesterday's post about Ann Coulter, could learn a lesson from Viera. With your permission, I will squeeze one more topic out of this post. Pride in Obama's ethnicity was not limited to Africa. Also controversial was the voter results from Philadelphia. Obama won every vote in 59 voting districts, with a tally of 19,605 to 0. Although the percentage, and the reported turnout of 90%, would normally fuel a demand for scrutiny, Obama's win was beyond the margins of doubt. As the world turns, my attention turns toward today and tomorrow. Israel is now defending itself on two fronts, with more enemies lining up. Resolution of the budget and tax cuts are crucial to our economy. My hope is that President Obama will fulfill the expectations of all citizens, regardless of who they voted for.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Funny how these otherwise intelligent people don't see the obvious.

Scott Armstrong

Anonymous said...

funny how you characterize the majority as stupid and blind.

Anonymous said...

When did this show open? Before the election?

michael molovinsky said...

@6:51, the show opened in early september. although the subject matter is obama, i do believe that it's intent and timing was NOT political. i provided a link to an article in the express times, which stated when the show started, and also discussed the political controversy. i provide such links so that i can both accommodate my writing style, and yet provide additional background information. although i appreciate everybody's readership, in selecting comments to publish, i favor those which do not ask questions, which require an answer from me or others who comment.

Anonymous said...

6:51AM,

Funny how you don’t have the guts to sign your name, anyway I did not write that the majority of the country is either stupid or blind.

Scott Armstrong

Anonymous said...

"He adds that if it has to occur, the place to be controversial is a university. He says the campus is where these things should be happening because students are supposed to be learning, discussing and seeing all sides of the ideological spectrum."

To make myself clear, this is what my morning post was referring to. At this point I would only add, wouldn't it be great if what is quoted was so?

Scott Armstrong