Nov 10, 2013

The Night of Broken Glass



In 1938,  on the nights of November 9 and 10, the Nazis whipped up anti-Jewish riots in a pogrom now known  as Kristallnacht.


During these two nights,    synagogues were set on fire and  thousands of Jewish shop windows were broken.



Ninety one Jews were killed.  30,000 were arrested and taken to camps, a harbinger of the Holocaust.

reprinted from previous years

6 comments:

Anonymous said...
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Anonymous said...

Mike you have the patience of Job to put up with him.

At a time where there are reports of increasing anti-semitism in Europe, we need even more so to remember the past. Here's an article that was in the NY Times just this past Friday:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/09/world/europe/jews-in-europe-report-a-surge-in-anti-semitism.html?_r=0

For those who say it couldn't happen again, my response is anything can happen if we're not vigilant to prevent it.

Thanks for posts like this.

The Banker

michael molovinsky said...

banker@10:55, i hate to give the animal exposure, especially on such a topic, but occasionally i think the public should see what those on his list are exposed to. his spouse says that he's the victim, defending himself, imagine that.
i reprint this post every year, but this year i will follow up with another piece.

Bernie O'Hare said...

For a chilling account of the Nazi monster, and the prevalence of anti-Semitism in pre-war Germany, I highly recommend Erik Larson's "In the Garden of Beasts." It's a riveting story of Ambassador William Dodd and his family, who were sent to Berlin in 1933. You can see the hatred get worse and worse, and the Ambassador send warning after warning.

Bernie O'Hare said...

Another book about this period, though a novel, is "The Book Thief," by Markus Zusak, about a German family who hid a Jew.

Bernie O'Hare said...

I notice that NPR, NBC and the Morning Call have all picked up on this sad day. The Pope spoke about it today, referring to Jews as "our big brothers."

It is an occasion to be remembered, and MM's has nothing to do pandering. The Blog Mentor trivializes what happened when he comes on here and dares disparage someone who remembers. It may or may not be anti-Semitic on his part. It certainly is insensitive.

He marginalized himself long ago. But that's what I've grown to expect from this unstable person, who doesn't really believe in anything, but has an enemy list longer than Richard Nixon's.