Sep 12, 2011

A Rude Visit

When Irene stormed through Cedar Park, she knocked down and broke a number of the old willow trees. The sight of these magnificent trees along the creek banks, is the view-shed cherished by us proponents of the historical park system. As a boy in 1955, I remember the same damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Diane. Many of the remaining willows are now about 75 years old. Although they held the creek banks together for three generations, they have lost favor to riparian buffers.


It's nice to sit by the bank under a willow tree and watch the ducks swim by. Hopefully, somewhere along the banks of the Little Lehigh and Cedar Creek, there is still some open space for a few new weeping willows.
please click on photos to enlarge

4 comments:

Patrick McHenry said...

Michael -

I can't understand why you dislike the riparian buffers.

After all, I find it quite enjoyable to head down to the Parkway and listen to the creek roll by just on the other side of a thicket of weeds. Why would anyone actually want to see the water too?

Besides, the buffers offer a habitat to all types of animals and non-native plants that might not thrive there otherwise. And the mini-swamps they create provide an excellent place for mosquitos to lay their eggs and multiply.

So instead of being such a naysayer, why not get with the program? And remember, the fact that City Hall laid off parks workers and no longer has the manpower to maintain the Parkway to a standard for humans to enjoy has nothing to do with the expansion of the buffers and "no-mow" zones.

michael molovinsky said...

well, like many things in the recent park plans, i have decided to move on. to that end, hopefully they will leave some area's open along the creeks. i actually plan on donating for a couple of willow trees creek side, if they're so interested. like wise, i have been contacted from someone about a limited donation next spring to the lawrence street steps, as an incentive for the park department to match with their budget.

Monkey Momma said...

OK, where is Kleiner?? Huh? This is up his alley.

I admit, I don't like the "look" of the buffer. But, isn't it true that if we had MORE riparian buffers, the erosion along the creek wouldn't have been so magnified? And therefore, the willow might still be standing. The fact that a grand willow fell points to the need for such buffers.

Weeping willows typically live about 30 years, if you're lucky. If these guys were 75 years old, I would say Allentown got a fair shake out of this magnificent tree.

Anonymous said...

Besides, the buffers offer a habitat to all types of animals and non-native plants that might not thrive there otherwise. And the mini-swamps they create provide an excellent place for mosquitos to lay their eggs and multiply."

And the pleasure of the poisonous insect sprays adds to the ambiance.
No?