Mar 1, 2011

The Trolley Parks


When the Allentown-Kutztown Tractor (Trolley) Company purchased Dorney Park in 1901, trolley companies were buying or building amusement parks all across the country. Perhaps the most famous was Coney Island. Usually located between two cities serviced by the company, it was a plan to increase weekend rider-ship. Passengers could spend a day at the park, swimming, picnicking, and partaking of the rides and amusements. Shown above is Rocky Glen Park, built by the Lackawanna & Wyoming Railroad's intercity Laurel Line between Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. Rocky Glen closed in 1988 and was completely demolished ten years later.

11 comments:

gary ledebur said...

Thanks, MM. I never knew the reason there was a swimming pool and park between New Brighton and Rochester PA called "Junction Park."

Anonymous said...

The old big Dorney Roller coaster.

Not quite as mammouth as Molovisnky's talent and skill for high culture with free admission.

Impressive, nevertheless.

Anonymous said...

The old big Dorney roller coaster.

Molovinsky's mammouth (sic) talent and skill for high culture can descend with equal speed as the coaster.

Anonymous said...

10:31 AM :

Should that unlikely scenario unfold, it would still be accurate to say at least Molovinsky had the talent to lose...

...which is always guaranteed to be more than can be said for you.

Now, hurry along.

All your buddies are waiting for you over at the Fuzzy Bunny's blog.

Sincerely,

10:09 AM

gary ledebur said...

how is it that the anonymous posters seem to know each other?

Anonymous said...

Wasn't there a 'Central Park' - an amusment park - between Bethlehem and Allentown that was served by trolleys that the transit operator had an interest?

michael molovinsky said...

i don't know if central park was a trolley park, i'll research. although there are many historical photographs around, i have avoided the topic because i have no personal knowledge of the park. also, i tend to avoid subjects which are so old that few remaining citizens would have any memory.

michael molovinsky said...

anon 7:22, yes, it was a trolley park and operated until the early 1950's. i mistakenly thought that it closed much earlier. thanks for the input.

Anonymous said...

Thanks, I could have researched it myself I guess. I was just remembering something someone had related to me about the area where the current Bennetts auto dealer is being a former amusement park. What struck me was the idea of trolley companies generating income from both amusement parks and bringing people to and from them. It's so 19th century - I'm not sure that could be recreated today. I suppose city parking lots adjacent to the proposed hockey stadium downtown would be somewhat analagous. Note there is no talk of linking of transit to the hockey facility.

michael molovinsky said...

ironically the site of the ill advised lanta transfer station would have been ideal for a hockey arena. it is a block long, and no buildings would had to be acquired. furthermore, it adjoins an underused parking deck. on second thought, they should still build it there, and return the transfer stops to hamilton street. win-win for everybody.

Anonymous said...

"How is it that the anonymous posters seem to know each other?"

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Oh, oh, oh
It's magic
You know
Never believe it's not so

10:09 AM